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Dr Maxine Akhurst, principal geologist at the British Geological Survey (project lead for work package 3), gets some help from two rock stars to show how certain rocks are ideal for storing the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2) deep below ground and ensuring it stays put.

By the time CO2 captured from an industrial facility arrives at a geological storage site, for example, beneath the North Sea, it will have been compressed to form a supercritical fluid, which is able to displace water from between the grains of sandstone.

We delivered our third knowledge-sharing webinar in February, which focused on transporting carbon dioxide (CO2) in varying volumes to offshore storage sites, and the opportunities as well as challenges involved.

If you missed the webinar or would like to hear the presentations again, download the recording here.

At the end of October, a team of ALIGN-CCUS research partners took the latest findings of our European project to an international audience at the GHGT-14 conference in Melbourne, Australia.

The GHGT conference series is the largest international gathering of carbon capture and storage (CCS) experts, and this year’s event was made even more pertinent by the IPCC’s recent report on global efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Interview with Joris Gazendam LL.M (left) of Groningen Centre of Energy Law, University of Groningen. Main photo: Kjetil Alsvik/Equinor

By Tom Mikunda, TNO

By Christine Boomsma, Senior Researcher, WP 6 (Task 6.2 Lead) and Emma ter Mors, Assistant Professor, WP6 Lead, both Leiden University

Social scientists working on public perceptions and acceptability in the CCUS field often get asked this question. When CO2 storage takes place offshore, rather than onshore, perhaps making use of existing infrastructures from the oil and gas industry; do we still need to be concerned with public responses to CCUS?

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